Biography of

Dr. Samuel Christopher Beard

 

Born 03 Oct 1831  New Lewisburg, Greenbrier County, WV
Died 26 Aug 1905
Married Martha Estaline Hamilton  12 Dec 1855
 

It was said that Dr. S. C. Beard would sometimes in one day ride sixty miles on horseback in his professional work. His sympathies were large and his field of labor was, too, and in order to meet the demands of so extensive a practice long journeys necessarily at times had to be taken. When the war broke out, and whenever possible, his services were joyfully given to the needs of the boys in the Confederate camps, the doctor being regarded as one of the most valued physicians in the army.

 

Children Born
Walter C. Beard  27 May 1859
Lillian H. Beard 11 Jun 1861
Delia Miriam Beard 11 Jan 1864
Margaret E. Beard 25 Nov 1866
Phillip J.A. Beard 28 Apr 1869
Samuel Charles Beard 06 Apr 1869
Emma Washington Cole Beard 23 Dec 1876

 

Cited in Battle of White Sulphur Springs by Col. Geo. S Patton (below), Aug 31, 1863.

 

 

 

 

References

http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=10168677&Type=Marriage

Marriage Record - 12 Dec 1855 Saml C. Beard + Esteline M. Hamilton, Age at Marriage 20y (Bridge) 23y (Groom), Greenbrier Co., WV

http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=2896097&Type=Death

Sam'l C. Beard Male, 26 Aug 1905, Lewisburg, Greenbrier, WV, Age at Death 73y 10m 23d, Burial Place Lewisburg, Greenbrier, WV; Burial Date 28 Aug 1905, Marital Status M, Occupation Physician.  No cause of death listed.

http://www.rootsweb.com/~wvgreenb/bios/bios-b.htm

SAMUEL CHRISTOPHER BEARD, M. D. - born near Lewisburg, Greenbrier County, October 3, 1831, at Blue Sulphur Spring, this county, December 12, 1855, was united in marriage with Martha Estaline HAMILTON, and the children born to them were seven: Walter C., May 27, 1859; Lillian H., June 11, 1861; Delia Miriam, January 11, 1864; Margaret E., November 25, 1866; Phil J. A., April28, 1869; Samuel C., April 6, 1872; Emma W. C., December 23, 1876; Delia M., died October 1875; Margaret E., died September 20, 1878; Walter C. is a practicing physician and makes his home in Alderson, this county, and the others are with their parents. Christopher BEARD, born near Lewisburg, April 1, 1798, died August 2, 1840, was the father of Dr. BEARD. His mother, whose maiden name was Miriam McNEAL, was born in Pocahontas County, December 7, 1834. [This could be a typo.] Her mother was born at that place, in 1810, and is now deceased, and her father, now deceased, was born on Muddy Creek, this county, in 1795. The BEARDS were among the pioneers of this county, noted for their industry, integrity, and interest in public advancement. They were bone and sinew of Presbyterianism in this community, and are recorded among the first elders of the faith in this county. Dr. BEARD lives on the old homestead, three miles northeast of Lewisburg, the farm containing 1,200 acres of valuable land. He receives his mail at Lewisburg, Greenbrier County, West Virginia

ftp://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/wv/greenbrier/bios/colebios/scbeard.txt

History of Greenbrier County

J. R. Cole

Lewisburg, WV 1917

p. 196-198

SAMUEL CHRISTOPHER BEARD, M.D.

In these days of automobile progression, physicians easily make their rounds, being able to see many patients daily, but in pioneer times it was different. It is said that Dr. S. C. Beard would sometimes in one day ride sixty miles on horseback in his professional work. His sympathies were large and his field of labor was, too, and in order to meet the demands of so extensive a practice long journeys necessarily at times had to be taken. When the war broke out, and whenever possible, his services were joyfully given to the needs of the boys in the Confederate camps, the doctor being regarded as one of the most valued physicians in the army. In the meantime, his private practice kept him busily engaged with the sick in his home surroundings, and until his death, in 1905, which closed a long and honorable career. Dr. Beard was thoroughly educated for his professional work. He completed his medical course in 1853, taking his degree, Doctor of Medicine, from the University of Virginia. A post-graduate course taken in Jefferson College, Philadelphia, subsequently, more fully equipped him for his life's work. Dr. S. C. Beard was born October 3, 1831, on a farm near Lewisburg, where his early boyhood days were spent. There were only two children, Dr. Beard and a brother, John A. Beard, who died in service the first year of the Civil war. He was a lieutenant in the cavalry and was with the Governor's Guards at the

time of his death. He was a son of Christopher and Miriam (McNeel) Beard, both natives of Virginia, and a grandson of Samuel Beard, of Scotch-Irish parentage, whose father, John, emigrated to America and settled in Pennsylvania, then later moved to Augusta county, Virginia, where he lived with his parents while a young man.

John Beard was a bold, venturesome man, and his courage was frequently needed in contests with the Indians. He married Janet Wallace and became the pioneer of Renick's Valley, Greenbrier county. This was about the year 1770. The young couple took up their abode in a cabin John had erected before his marriage on lands afterwards occupied by Abram Beard, his grandson. Here they reared a large family of sons and daughters, Samuel being the grandfather of the doctor. Samuel Beard married Margaret Walkup, and their children were: Tommie, Jesse, William R., Josiah, Margaret, Jane, Nancy, Siby and Mary. Margaret became the second wife of Thomas Price. Josiah was the first clerk of Greenbrier after its organization. His wife was Rachael Cameron Poage, daughter of Mayor William Poage, of Marlin's Bottom. William R. married Margaret McNeel.

Christopher Beard, the father of Dr. Beard, was born April 1, 1798, and died August 2, 1840. He was a large farmer, led a quiet and unobtrusive life, and became a useful citizen. His widow, who survived him until 1888, died at the age of nearly eighty eight years. She was the daughter of Abraham McNeel, of Scotch descent. Her grandfather, John McNeel, married Martha Davis, a zealous convert of John Wesley, and through her influence her husband erected the first log cabin for religious worship west of the Allegheny Mountains. Their home in Pocahontas county was near this church, where Bishop Asbury, the noted Methodist divine, often stopped over night.

John McNeel appears to have been the first to occupy the Littie Levels coming there about the year 1765. On October 10, 1784, we hear of him in camp at Lewisburg, joining the expedition to Point Pleasant.Children horn to John and Martha (Davis) McNeel were:Abraham, whose second wife was Miss Bridger; Betsy, John, Abe, Patsy, and Margaret, who married William Beard; and Miriam, who married Christopher Beard. She was horn in 1808, on the seventh of December, in Pocahontas county. She was married when sixteen years of age and lived on the farm three

miles above Lewisburg to the age of eighty-three.Jacob and Delilah (Jarrett) Hamilton were the parents of Estaline Montgomery, wife of Dr. Beard. Estaline Montgomery Hamilton was born at Blue Sulphur Springs, December 7, 1834. Her mother was born at that place in 1810. Her father was born on Muddy creek in 1795. She was united in marriage to Dr. Beard, December 12, 1855, and the children born to this union were Walter C., Lillian H., Delia Miriam, Margaret E., Phil J. A., Samuel C. and Emma W. Delia M., Margaret E. and Phil J. A. died several years prior to this sketch.The homestead, three miles north of Lewisburg, originally consisted of 1,200 acres of land.

From WV Encylopedia
Dr. S.C.Beard (1831-1905) was the older of two sons of Christopher Beard, his brother, John Abraham, dying from Civil War wounds. Dr. Beard spent his early years on a farm and attended the Lewisburg schools. In 1853, he graduated from the University of Virginia,. He followed his profession at Blue Sulpher Springs, Greenbrier County, for seven years, but when the war broke out he returned home to protect his mother and to run her farm. Although never officially connected to the Army, Dr. Beard saw so much experience during the progress of the war and so frequently gave his services, that he really was one of the most valued physicians and surgeons of the Confederate Army in that part of the state.
On Dec. 12, 1855, Dr. Beard was united in marriage to Estaline M. Hamilton, who was born near Blue Sulpher Springs, Virginia, now part of West Virginia, and was a daughter of Jacob and Delilah (Jarrett) Hamilton.
http://www.rootsweb.com/~wvgreenb/bios/bios-b.htm

SAMUEL CHRISTOPHER BEARD, M. D. - born near Lewisburg, Greenbrier County, October 3, 1831, at Blue Sulphur Spring, this county, December 12, 1855, was united in marriage with Martha Estaline HAMILTON, and the children born to them were seven: Walter C., May 27, 1859; Lillian H., June 11, 1861; Delia Miriam, January 11, 1864; Margaret E., November 25, 1866; Phil J. A., April28, 1869; Samuel C., April 6, 1872; Emma W. C., December 23, 1876; Delia M., died October 1875; Margaret E., died September 20, 1878; Walter C. is a practicing physician and makes his home in Alderson, this county, and the others are with their parents. Christopher BEARD, born near Lewisburg, April 1, 1798, died August 2, 1840, was the father of Dr. BEARD. His mother, whose maiden name was Miriam McNEAL, was born in Pocahontas County, December 7, 1834. [This could be a typo.] Her mother was born at that place, in 1810, and is now deceased, and her father, now deceased, was born on Muddy Creek, this county, in 1795. The BEARDS were among the pioneers of this county, noted for their industry, integrity, and interest in public advancement. They were bone and sinew of Presbyterianism in this community, and are recorded among the first elders of the faith in this county. Dr. BEARD lives on the old homestead, three miles northeast of Lewisburg, the farm containing 1,200 acres of valuable land. He receives his mail at Lewisburg, Greenbrier County, West Virginia.

From Battle of White Sulphur Springs

Report of Col. George S. Patton, Twenty-second Virginia Infantry, commanding brigade.

HDQRS. FIRST BRIGADE, ARMY OF WESTERN VIRGINIA,

Lewisburg, August 31, 1863.

MAJOR: I have the honor to submit the following report : I arrived on the morning of the 30th instant, about 9.30 o'clock, with my command (after a march of nearly twenty-four consecutive hours) at the junction of the Huntersville road with the James River and Kanawha turnpike. Information had been received the night before of the presence of the enemy on the latter road, moving in the direction of the White Sulphur Springs and Lewisburg, and I had been ordered by Major-General Jones to endeavor to intercept him. This cross-road is about a mile and a half east of the springs, and is just where the latter road emerges from a mountain gorge.

The enemy's advance was discovered just as the Twenty-sixth Virginia Battalion, under Lieut. Col. George M. Edgar, reached and passed the junction. I immediately ordered Colonel Edgar to countermarch his men and form them in line of battle across the road, facing to the eastward, and to deploy a company of skirmishers to his left and front, and to advance to Miller's house at the point -, on the accompanying diagram. This company, under command of Capt. Edmund S. Read, commenced the engagement by firing upon and driving back the enemy's advance.

Capt. G. B. Chapman's battery of four pieces now came up at a gallop, and immediately formed battery to the left of the Huntersville road in rear of Colonel Edgar's battalion and on a knoll, and opened fire upon the road along which the enemy was advancing and upon his reconnoitering parties, which had now appeared. The Twenty-second and Forty-fifth Virginia Regiments next came up in fine style, and were formed in line of battle, the first on the left and the latter on the right of the battery.

The enemy now brought six pieces of artillery to bear, and opened fire upon Chapman, who replied with great spirit and accuracy. An artillery duel of great heat ensued and lasted for more than two hours, when one of our pieces was disabled and another temporarily silenced.

In the meantime the Twenty-second Regiment was advanced to a fence running across a gentle ascent of open ground, and five of its companies deployed as skirmishers to take possession of the thickly wooded hill on the left of Miller's house, connecting on the right with Colonel Edgar's skirmishers. The Forty-fifth Virginia Regiment also was advanced on the right through a corn-field and took position with Colonel Edgar, who with them hastily threw up a rail barricade across the road and bottom, to an abrupt and well-wooded hill on their right, on which Major Woodram, with three companies, had been posted to observe the enemy's movements in that direction. Observing that the enemy was moving forces to his left, I ordered Colonel Browne, of the Forty-fifth Virginia, to move by the right flank, possess the hill, and hold it against the enemy.

These dispositions were scarcely concluded when the enemy advanced along the whole line and the action became general and heavy. Our skirmishers in advance on the left were now hotly pressed by largely superior numbers, but under the leadership of Lieut. Col. Andrew R. Barbee, of the Twenty-second Virginia Regiment, held their ground with admirable tenacity until their ammunition was exhausted, when they fell back in good order without any confusion, and, with the exception of a part of one company which was able to rejoin its regiment, were, by the nature of the ground, forced to take position on the extreme left of our line. In this change of position Lieut. Col. A. R. Barbee was severely wounded after being conspicuous for gallantry.

Repeated charges were now made on the right and left, which were in every instance handsomely repulsed. Desperate efforts were made to dislodge the Forty-fifth Regiment, but the steadiness of that regiment and the courage and skill of its commander foiled them all. During this time the fire of musketry and artillery was heavy and continuous. Chapman with his two pieces gallantly holding his own against the six of the enemy.

The enemy were bringing fresh troops into action and strengthening their position and line, and the issue of the contest seemed doubtful, when Lieutenant-Colonel Derrick, with his Twenty-third Virginia Battalion and about 200 of the Thirty-seventh Virginia Cavalry Battalion, arrived from Greenbrier Bridge. Colonel Derrick, with the Twenty-third, was immediately advanced to the left of the Twenty-second Regiment, not in the prolongation of the same line, as at first intended, but equally as near the enemy on the opposite hill, which tended in his direction.

In order to get to his position Colonel D. was compelled to move under a perfect storm of shot and shell, which caused some loss and some confusion, which latter was quickly remedied by that gallant officer. In obedience to my instructions, two companies of the Twenty-third, under Major Blessing, advanced through the open field under a galling fire, and took position on the left of the Twenty- second Regiment, where they remained during the remainder of the action.

At this juncture the enemy made a determined charge against Major Bailey near the center of our lines, who handsomely repulsed them, and drove them back in confusion, capturing their leader, Major McNally, and killing and wounding many within 15 paces of our lines.

This charge had hardly been repulsed when the enemy formed a squadron of cavalry on the main road, who charged Colonel Edgar's position, but were driven back in utter confusion and rout, many of their horses coming into our lines. A second charge was no more successful.

Having thus tried the left and center, a very heavy force of at least two regiments was formed to force my right, but Colonel Browne, ever vigilant, informed me in time to send him Major Claiborne, with about 200 men of the Thirty-seventh Battalion, and with them again repulsed the enemy with great slaughter.

It was now getting late in the evening. The enemy had been repulsed at all points, and not a foot of ground lost by our men since morning. For some time the action was almost suspended, except for the dropping fire of sharpshooters and the occasional boom of a gun. Just at sunset, however, the increased rapidity of the firing and the reopening of artillery foretold another attack. For a few moments the firing was very heavy, and then the enemy charged Colonel Edgar's position, but, as usual, was repulsed handsomely. It was now night, and, after nine hours of fighting, the action ceased, the enemy still remaining in front. Sentinels were posted in front of the lines, and the two forces lay down to rest less than 300 yards apart.

The night was spent in visiting the lines, strengthening the weak points, and causing the wounded to be removed and cared for. At daybreak the attempt was again made to storm our position, but with so little spirit that it was evident that the enemy had lost confidence. They replied to our artillery, however, and maintained a brisk fire of small-arms until about noon, when, after another ineffectual attack, they commenced to retreat. Pursuit was immediately made by Col. J. M. Corns, of the Eighth Virginia Cavalry, with a portion of his regiment, the Thirty-seventh Battalion, and a piece of artillery, and the infantry advanced.

It was soon found, however, that the enemy had so heavily blockaded in their rear that much delay would be experienced. Pioneer parties were detailed to cut out the blockade, and very early the next morning the cavalry started again in pursuit, the infantry also moving as far as Callaghan's, when it was found that the enemy had passed Gatewood's, where it had been hoped they would have been intercepted by Colonel Jackson's command. I was then ordered by the major-general commanding to return to this point.

My force in the action consisted of the Forty-fifth and Twenty- second Virginia Regiments, Twenty-sixth Virginia Battalion, Twenty- third Virginia Battalion, a detachment of the Thirty-seventh Cavalry Battalion, and Chapman's battery of four pieces; in all about 1,900 men. Colonel Corns, with his cavalry, was not in the action on the first day, and only a mall portion on the second day, yet rendered efficient service in pursuit. The enemy's force was all mounted (about 3,500 strong), under Brigadier-General Averell, and consisted of five regiments, a battalion, and six pieces of artillery.

Our loss was 154 killed and wounded and 18 missing. That of the enemy, as estimated by themselves (especially a captured surgeon), between 400 and 500. We captured 117 prisoners, including a major and 3 captains (many of them wounded), and - pieces of artillery.

It would be invidious, where all conducted themselves so well, to make particular mention of any, but I feel bound to express my appreciation of the high service of the regimental and battalion commanders, and Capt. G. B. Chapman, of the battery. I also take great pleasure in mentioning the valuable services of Major McLaughlin, chief of artillery of this department, who was with me during the entire action, and aided me much by his excellent judgment, and acted with conspicuous gallantry.

My thanks are also especially due to Lieut. J. W. Branham, of General Echols' personal staff, who has been serving with me since the general has been absent. He did us great service by a reconnaissance in rear of the enemy, the result of which he reported just as we were going into action, and during the fight he exhibited the utmost energy, skill, and courage.

I take occasion also to call favorable attention to the conduct and gallantry of Lieut. Noyes Rand, acting assistant adjutant-general of the brigade ; Lieut. E. C. Gordon, ordnance officer ; Lieut. James F. Patton, acting brigade inspector, and Lieut. Henry C. Caldwell, volunteer aide.

Lieut. Col. A. C. Dunn, although under arrest, offered his services on the field ; throughout behaved in the most soldier like and gallant manner, and at a critical moment encouraged his men by his voice and example.

My thanks are also due to Maj. W. B. Myers, assistant adjutant- general; Capt. R. L. Poor, Engineer Corps, and Lieut. P. C. Warwick, of General Jones' staff, who gave me their services and behaved most gallantly.

I must not omit to mention the valuable services of the medical staff of the brigade, who were always on hand and promptly attended to the wounded. Dr. Beard, of Greenbrier, not in the service, was present as acting surgeon of the Twenty-sixth Virginia Battalion, and was most conspicuous for energy and efficiency.

I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant.

GEO. S. PATTON,

Colonel, Commanding.

Maj. C. S. STRINGFELLOW,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

http://ftp.rootsweb.ancestry.com/pub/usgenweb/wv/greenbrier/cemetery/micscems.txt

Old Stone Church Cemetery

Beard
Alice C. Jan.6,1831-June 18,1874   43Y 5M 12D
Delia M. Jan.11,1864-Oct.26,1865   1Y 9M 15D
Elizabeth Sep.19,1854 w/o Andrew
Etaline M. Hamilton Dec.7,1835-Dec.4,1912 w/o S C. 76Y 11M 28D
Lillian R. June.11,1861-July 24,1918  57Y 1M 13D
Margaret E. Nov.25, 1866-Sep.20,1878  11Y 9M 25D
Phil J  Apr.28.1869-Dec.31,1892  23Y 8M 3D
Ruth Mason Apr.30,1874 2nd w/o S C  43Y 9M 4D
Dr. S.C. Oct.3,1831-Auf.26,1905   74Y 9M 4D
Samuel S Dec.31,1910-June 4,1911 s/o S C & R M    5M 5D
Silas Boxley Apr.8,1903-Aug.2,1903   4M  6D